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Bill of Rights Scrapbook   Tags: 9th grade, political_science, social_studies  

Mr. Biglari's 9th grade political science project
Last Updated: Sep 29, 2015 URL: http://gallowayschool.libguides.com/billofrights Print Guide RSS Updates
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EBSCO MAS Ultra

MAS Ultra
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Resources: EBSCO MAS Ultra

Christian Science Monitor (1995-present full text in EBSCO MAS-Ultra database)

National Review (1985-present full text in EBSCO MAS-Ultra database)

New Republic (1985-present full text in EBSCO MAS-Ultra database)

Time Magazine (1990-present full text in EBSCO MAS-Ultra database)

 

ProQuest Newspapers & Periodicals

Go directly to ProQuest Central

 

Sources: ProQuest

Atlanta Journal Constitution (AJC) (1995-present in ProQuest)

Newsweek (1998-2012 full text in Proquest)

New York Times (1980-present full text in Proquest)

Wall Street Journal (1984-present full text in Proquest)

Washington Post (1987-present full text in Proquest)

 

New York Times

Sign up for Galloway's academic access to the New York Times. 

Visit nytimes.com/passes. Create a free NYTimes.com account using your school email address. If you already have an NYTimes.com account associated with your school email address, log in with those credentials. Check your email inbox for our confirmation message. Click on the link in your confirmation message to validate your email address and claim your Pass. You have successfully claimed a Pass when you see the Start Your Access screen

 

Sources: Online Only

 

Cite Your Sources!

  noodletools

Use Noodle Tools to cite your articles and images

Login to the Library Databases for database passwords

 

Reminders

--- Your articles must be about events that happened in the U.S.

--- Your source must be a news article and not an academic article or a summary of a Supreme Case.

--- The article must be about a controversy or a dispute between the government and an individual.

--- The articles do not have to be about a court case.

--- Type in the actual provision in quotes (i.e. “no cruel and unusual punishment”, and not the number of the amendment (i.e. “8th Amendment) when looking up articles.

--- If you have trouble finding articles, come and see me ASAP.

--- There is no required time period for the articles (1776-2015!)

--- Your image must not contain words.

--- You must paraphrase what the Amendment says and not copy it word for word on the cover pages. You must reference Congress when paraphrasing the first Amendment.

--- Give the image a label in parenthesis and put it under the image.

--- Your first paragraph must contain a detailed summary of the story and the arguments on each side. No personal opinion or extra research should be included in the write-ups.

---  Your second paragraph of the write-up must be two sentences and in the correct format.

The article is a reflection of (    ) Amendment because (     ). The article discussed a dispute between (   ) and (    ) and the main question is (    ).

--- You can do no more than 1 article per provision. (i.e. 1 article on freedom of religion only)

--- The article must be at least 1 page long, and no longer than 3 pages.

--- Minimize the number of quotes in the write-up. Paraphrase everything!

--- Paraphrasing does not equal only moving or changing a couple of words in a sentence!

--- Put the cover page, article, and write-up in order in the scrapbook.

--- Put the entries in order of the Amendments in the scrapbook.(1st Amendment before 2nd, 2nd Amendment before 4th, ….)

--- Your Table of Contents must include title of article and author, Amendment and provision, date of article, source, and page numbers.

--- The last page of your scrapbook is Work Cited page (MLA format). You must list all sources (articles and images) in alphabetical order.

--- If the article addresses what a Justice says about the case, take it seriously. The comments by Justices are often arguments supporting a side 

--- As you are reading the article, prepare a list or highlight the argument , the story, and the question in the case.

--- A few cases involve multiple provisions. If so, choose the provision that is more applicable in the case as the one you are doing for the project.

--- Your options are the Bill of Rights and the 14Th Amendment.

 

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